LADY BE GOOD - Museum Project

Museums and monuments

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Beitragvon mbberlin » 11/11/2007, 15:20

DAKKER hat geschrieben: But not many comments.


What are you waiting for? That a rich guy says: "Wow, nice idea to restore it. I like to make a donation of 500.000 USD. Please give me your bank account!"?

There is a lot of hand work needed before it is posssible to get any invests for a restauration. A serious financial planning, the right connections to the Libyan Government and do on.

I'm sure it is possible, but it needs some people who are fighting hard for it. Fundraising isn't a game.
mbberlin
 

Beitragvon Kuno » 12/11/2007, 07:36

Why do you always insist in RESTAURATION? That this costs oney is clear - I did only think to arrange the parts in the same way as they have been found in the desert...
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Beitragvon mbberlin » 12/11/2007, 12:46

Even if it should be displayed in this way, the parts need conservation.

I think Tobruk has other climatical parameters than the open desert and the followwing corrosion will kill it sooner or later.
mbberlin
 

Beitragvon Kuno » 12/11/2007, 17:40

Corrosion might be a subject. Only, until now I cannot recognize that the wreckage is suffering from corrosion. However; some conservation would probably be necessary though.
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Beitragvon AlAghrab » 14/11/2007, 13:34

I'd think mbb to be right about the deterioration in the long term - from climate or with human "assistance". Even the IWM Duxford has now had to build super size hangers to store their aircraft in to preserve them against the elements - they originally thought they would be OK outside but it was not the case (even tho Tobruk has nicer weather than Duxford)

stored outside aircraft need constant maintenance to preserve them and LBG only survived so well due to the remote location and desert climate conditions, which are not the same as found at Tobruk

it would be nice to display the aircraft as found as that's the main part of the interesting history of it. I guess also why the ex-egypt LRDG Chevy is shown in the IWM "as found"
As a B24 its not unique - There are a couple of other B24's airworthy .... and probably easier restoration candidates to be found -
besides the way Warbird restoration seems to work is that they build whats effectively a whole new aircraft anyway where virtually the only actual original part is the serial number plate - so maybe there could be scope for an "original " replica (or three) *and* the actual wreck too!

If it was back in USA there would probably be a Las Vegas casino complex built around it :)
AlAghrab
 

Beitragvon mbberlin » 14/11/2007, 14:31

May be it would go to Vegas or to a rich collector, who didn't want to show it.

I think if it will be conservated, it is the right way. Collectors are dying some day and Casinos are sooner or later going the way like the "Sands".

But if the wreck still exists it is also a treasure for coming generations. In the moment there are same B-24, but hwo is the situation in 50 or 100 years? I'm sure there will be a lot of historical enthusiasts too. And I don't think it is the right way to "present" it like a car wreck at a dirty corner in Libya.
mbberlin
 

Beitragvon neil » 15/11/2007, 09:02

Well...If the Museum takes care of it and treats it well, there is a chance that some of the parts removed might be returned. As I remember it, many of the "major" parts were removed for research, meaning that if they survived, are sitting in a shed somewhere.

I live south of Lake Superior, in Minnesota. There was a 1800 shipwreck on the beach that had been stripped over the years. When it's remains were recovered to a museum, people started returning things they took, including the mast!

It's not the same, I know. but maybe....

neil
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Beitragvon mbberlin » 15/11/2007, 11:36

neil hat geschrieben:museum,


Are you talking about the S.S. Meteor Museum in Superior, Wisconsin? I've visited it some years ago.
mbberlin
 

Beitragvon silvanomarti » 15/11/2007, 20:44

I like the dreamers.........really, but the reality of LBG is "terrible".
Sorry, I confirm my previous opinion about that.
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Beitragvon Kuno » 15/11/2007, 20:46

Actually I was hoping fo some "US support" to this topic. But obviously this is not the case... would be difficult for me to address to the responible people in Libya like this :-(
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Beitragvon AlAghrab » 23/11/2007, 04:07

I am told by a friend who is in the warbird restoration industry there are/were some pretty good tax incentives in USA for restoring historically important items like the LBG - Microsoft and other similar large firms looking for tax writeoffs have been restoring similar WW2 aircraft wrecks - seem to find the few million $$$ no problem when they want to...
AlAghrab
 

Beitragvon AlAghrab » 23/11/2007, 04:39

IMHO LY authorities should be encouraged to preserve it one way or another - it is important from many aspects that this should not be allowed to disappear. It does not have to cost millions of $$$ to do...

Locally to me there's a Hurricane being restored from what was for 65 years a crumpled pile of scrap buried deep in a French field - on the face of it was also a crazy idea financially and technically "impossible" yet there it now stands nearly complete again after many hours of restoration work - and also not far away is a complete running Lancaster (which would fly if the authorities let it)- both these restored by enthusiasts/volunteers . Sure it cost them a few $$$ to do but mostly just time and effort . The Lancaster was for sure a long term project (and had to be rebuilt twice if I remember as it was crushed when a hanger it was stored in collapsed) It is now a major tourist attraction...
Zuletzt geändert von AlAghrab am 23/11/2007, 05:06, insgesamt 2-mal geändert.
AlAghrab
 

Beitragvon AlAghrab » 23/11/2007, 04:55

Whatever, I am glad these aircraft now survive - even though they were the means of causing much death and destruction for many involved, as it means future generations have something tangible to see and hear, not just a picture on TV or in a history book. It may help them get a better understand what happened 65 years ago and why (with politicians still ready & willing to send young men to their untimely deaths) hopefully learn to avoid at all costs such conflict in the future ...
AlAghrab
 

Beitragvon Kuno » 14/1/2008, 13:27

Here an example for the display of a "desert wreck":

http://www.mms.qld.edu.au/getting-about/avro-crash.htm
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Beitragvon Kuno » 30/1/2008, 08:41

...have been contacted by a veteran of the US army who was at the crashsite in 1960. Very interesting. And for those who are "behind the subject"; new photos of the LbG have recently been published in the German magazine "Flugzeug CLASSIC" / February 2008.
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